Administration discusses Tiger's Loft Bistro, possible textbook cart

The Newtonite

by Jared Perlo
In the recent weeks, Student Faculty Administration members have discussed several key issues, including the Tiger’s Loft Bistro ending its servicesto students and student access to textbooks and computers during study halls.
Several weeks ago, the school administration revealed to this school’s community that the Tiger’s Loft was in violation of federal law.
According to principal Jennifer Price, if a school receives federal subsidies for a free and reduced lunch program, there cannot be another venue in the school that sells food to students.
“We have been in violation of federal law for many years. By doing so, we put in jeopardy our free and reduced lunch program,” Price said.
She revealed that the administration has known about the violation for several years, but has been constantly fighting the legislation.
However, despite its ending of services to students, Price said she wants to continue the culinary arts program in as full capacity as possible. “If we argue that learning the culinary arts is eating the food, we can allow students to eat their own food,” she said.
Another hot topic for the SFA this year has been its effort to improve students’ experiences in study halls and canceled classes. In its latest effort, SFA members have been inching closer to deciding on a plan to provide greater access to textbooks and computers during study halls.
Several different proposals have recently surfaced, but the consensus among members is that the next viable step would be to designate a library cart stacked with textbooks to wheel around to different classrooms.
SFA members decided to send delegates to a meeting of the Admin Team, a group of administrators, to lobby for textbooks. Sophomore Ned Martenis won the student position over fellow sophomore Liran Bromberg in a 2-0 game of Rocks, Paper, Scissors, Shoot.
Price raised some concern over the textbooks, however, saying that the idea to cart textbooks around the school has failed in the past. “We have done this before, and textbooks have walked,” she said.