Review: 'Freshman Cabaret' showcases talent, creativity

The Newtonite

by Fatema Zaidi
Showcasing the various talents of the freshmen at this school, “Freshman Cabaret,” directed by sophomores Alex Shames, Alyssa Steffen, Juliet Roll and Kelsey Fox, is going up tonight at 7:30 in the auditorium and will be performed through tomorrow.
The show is unlike any other Theatre Ink production because everyone who auditions is cast and because it is composed of several skits and songs that relate to the themes of expressing oneself and embracing diversity. The wonderful skits and songs definitely connected with these ideas.
Stepping out of the shadows, the curtains opened to Julia Saukkonen singing “Feeling Good” from Roar of the Greasepaint, Smell of the Crowd.
Several students sang different parts of the song, and later, the whole cast joined in, dancing in the background.
Rocking back and forth, the audience members had a strong connection to this song because they could relate to the lyrics.
Another empowering song, “You’re The Voice” by John Farnham, was also really nice to listen to. When the singers sang the chorus together, their beautiful voices rang out, filling the room.

Lyrics such as “We have the chance to turn the pages over/We can write what we want to write” and the chorus, “You’re the voice/try and understand it/Make a noise and make it clear” have a strong connection to the theme of the show, and it was sung beautifully.

One of the most enjoyable portions of the show was the annual “Boys’ Dance,” which was to the song “It’s Raining Men” by The Weather Girls.

The boys use blue umbrellas to add hilarity and fun to the performance by twisting the umbrellas towards the audience and putting them behind their backs.

They wear sunglasses, and there is even a cartwheel at the end to pull the whole dance together.

Blue lights and the sound of rain in the background really add to the effect, and the audience roared with laughter and whistled during this fantastic and upbeat performance.

Numerous skits, chosen from various shows or written by sophomore Kelsey Fox, were also extremely witty and creative.

In the first skit, Nellie Robinson is wearing all black with yellow stripes going vertically on her body made her resemble a highway. Her parents, played by Ashley Campbell and Shira Stonehill, made her sit down as they told her that they adopted her after seeing an “adopt-a-highway” sign on the road. Puns and word play, such as “That road is now blocked” and “This doesn’t have to be a red light” adds to the hilarity of the skit.

The moans and groans of a pregnant lady, portrayed by Sadiya Ervin, in the back of a car on the way to the hospital marks the start of another skit. This one is about a young man, played by Jonah Samuels, arguing with his possessive GPS, played by Michaela Vecchione, as he tries to take his wife to the hospital.The GPS knows he is going to buy a van after the baby is born and is furious that he will now have a built in GPS in his new car.

Such a conversation really makes the audience wonder what life would be like if GPS could interact with us.

Overall, the enthusiasm and creativity present in “Freshmen Cabaret” made the show both enjoyable and relaxing. The talent and potential of the freshmen was highlighted through a mix of incredible acting and wonderfully sung and choreographed songs.