Editorial: Stay informed about upcoming election

The Newtonite

[media-credit name=”Jay Feinstein” align=”alignleft” width=”300″] Juniors Ben Galgano, and Maggie Garg and sophomore Rudy Gelb-Bicknell take Close Up: Seminar in Government, a class that focuses on contemporary political conflicts. Even though students cannot vote, they need to be informed politically.

Tonight, President Obama and Mitt Romney will take part in the final presidential debate, and in two weeks, voters will elect one of these two men as president.

Students should watch this debate in order to stay politically informed, so they can formulate educated opinions on both candidates.

Although the election may seem unimportant to many students who cannot vote, the 2012 elections are vitally important to our future.

Students who cannot vote can still stay politically active. Once they formulate their opinions by reading the news and listening to commentary, they can support a candidate, presidential or local, by volunteering for his or her campaign. For example, if you support Joe Kennedy III, you could join the Students for Joe Kennedy Club.

Although most of us cannot vote now, the next four years will affect our future. The lagging economy will have repercussions on students trying to find jobs and votes on immigration and college loans will affect immigrants and college-bound students that need loans. Because of the prominent issues the next president will affect, students should support and campaign for one of the two candidates.

For students who can vote, the final debate should help them make up their mind as to who they will vote for for president. Upperclassmen and teachers who are eligible to vote in the upcoming election should exercise their right as citizens to vote. It is our duty as citizens to vote so that we are represented in the country and so that our voices are heard.

Romney and Obama have radically different plans, and students should pay attention to tonight’s debate because the next president will have a huge impact on their lives. And for students who are 18, make an informed decision and vote.