Column: Jobs help students learn life skills

The Newtonite

[media-credit name=”Leah Budson” align=”alignnone” width=”300″][/media-credit]

In the Tiger’s Loft Bistro, culinary arts teacher Lisa Marzilli teaches freshmen Tess Simmons, Nathan Buckwald and Mimi Daniel how to serve customers and how to use a cash register. These are two of the many valuable skills students can learn through a job.

by Connor Vasu

In addition to plenty of extracurricular activities such as sports, Theatre Ink and clubs, some students work after school. Working is a rewarding experience, and it teaches students a real-life lesson in economics.

Unlike school, if a worker shows up late repeatedly to his shift, he can potentially be fired. When students are forced to show up on time for work, they may straighten up their attitudes toward meeting deadlines, showing up to class on time and doing schoolwork.

Gaining working experience can only help a student’s employment chances after high school. For example, a manager of a restaurant would be more inclined to hire an employee who has prior restaurant experience.

Furthermore, working produces paychecks that can help students save for college. Pay also serves as a monthly source of income. Like younger kids’ allowances, a regular source of income serves as monetary lesson to those who work. Workers have to allot their money appropriately, pay taxes and save.

As an employee, students learn how business works better than they could have in a class. Hands-on experience sinks can be more beneficial than lectures and notes.

Finally, working teaches students how to juggle school and work. Learning how to balance a tight schedule in high school can help later on in life when one has to support a family.

Employment in high school helps students gain experience juggling activities, money and working skills, so consider finding a job.